How to handle a power tripping boss?

How to handle a power tripping boss?

If you’re a typical employee that goes the extra mile, it can be annoying to feel underappreciated at work. Often, an incapable boss will feel threatened by skilled subordinates. The last thing that you need is a power struggle in the workplace. After all, your aim is to perform as well as you can and to establish yourself as a reliable employee for your manager. If you feel like your boss is on a power trip, consider your options. There are some strategies that can help you navigate the situation.

Stay Connected to your Boss

 

 

 

You may be tempted to avoid your boss, but push yourself to develop a strong relationship. It’s possible that the power struggles you observe at work are just misunderstandings. Meet with your boss frequently and remind them that your goal is to enhance their reputation with the higher-ups. Engage them in a discussion about what they want to see from your work. If possible, help them feel responsible for new ideas and initiatives that you have led.

Continue to Do Your Best Work

 

 

 

When you start to feel like you’re at the center of a power struggle in the workplace, your first instinct might be to tone down your work performance. Resist the urge to underperform. Continue to do your best work, but be mindful about how you communicate your achievements. It’s possible that your excitement at getting that big client would come across as bragging. Do your best to address your accomplishments as a shared success with your boss.

Always Take Care of Yourself

 

It’s hard to believe that an outstanding employee could be fired for being great, but it does happen. An insecure and incapable boss may target you if they feel threatened. Cover yourself, just in case, by keeping a journal of issues that arise. It may seem silly, but it’s important to have a record of what has happened. You may want to keep the documentation at home and don’t share it with your colleagues.

Above all, you need to maintain your sanity. If power games at work become too much, your health may suffer. Employees who are stressed are more likely to experience health issues. Don’t let an unprofessional boss push you over the edge. If you can’t handle the issues, look for a different job. Making the decision to stay requires a lot of effort on your part to work through the issues.

Talk to the Top Manager

 

As a last resort, you can have a discussion with the head manager. The decision to do so is riddled with risks. Your boss might be looking for a job search as a result of your complaint. It’s also possible that you could be the one who has to walk outside. Only you are aware of your company’s real culture.

If you don’t file a complaint, you may be able to find a way to seek a mentor at the company. Use the opportunity to connect with someone outside of your department as a way to learn more about the organization. Do not engage in conversations about the power struggle at work. Anything that you say could get back to your boss. Choose someone from outside of the organization if you need to vent, and be sure they’ll keep your communication private.

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